Sunday, June 20, 2021
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“Push Yourself Just A Little Bit More” by Johnny Green

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Johnny Green
Push Yourself is a good fun read, which will make you want to go and see the races for yourself.

“Push Yourself Just A Little Bit More” by Johnny Green is an interesting read, mostly because it’s a book about the Tour de France, written by someone who isn’t a typical cycling journo.

For sure that’s not to say it’s a kinda: “Le Tour for Dummies“, explaining for example what ‘le peloton’ is and what ‘attacking’ means, but it is interesting to read about the race from a priviledged spectator’s point of view – Johnny is simply a fan of the race, who has managed to blag himself and his pals press passes with no intention of doing any serious writing or coverage of the event itself.

As someone who has spent time at the roadside,: in cafe’s, and as a member of the press corps covering the race, I could relate so much to his experiences.

It’s made doubly entertaining because it is interlaced with comments about various rock bands on tour: the previous book I’d read by Johnny was “A Riot Of Our Own“, about his time touring with The Clash (one of my favourite bands).

Johnny also draws parallels between a rock star’s requirements to keep going on tour, even when totally exhausted, and a pro cyclist’s – he has a very laid back and sympathetic attitude to the use of “substances”.

Overall, the book is simply a good laugh, and it manages to portray just how much fun there is to be had in following a bike race with your pals.

Anyone for the Ronde van Vlaanderen next spring?  Ed? … Stevie?

Pick something else from: the Bookshelf.

Martin Williamson
Martin is our Editor, Web site Designer and Manager, and concentrates on photography. He's been involved in cycling for over 42 years and has raced for many of them, having a varied career which includes time trials, road and track racing, and triathlons. Martin has been the Scottish 25 Mile TT and 100 Mile TT Champion, the British Points Race League Champion on the track, and was a prolific winner of time trials in his day, particularly hilly ones like the Tour de Trossachs and the Meldons MTT.

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