Monday, July 26, 2021
HomeBlogsEx-Garmin Physio Toby Watson's BlogThe Two Day Theory: TdF 2010 Stage 4 (bunchie)

The Two Day Theory: TdF 2010 Stage 4 (bunchie)

-

Two Day Theory. It is a very fortunate thing that the situation that Garmin-Transitions is in during this Tour is a first time for all of us involved. The fortune I speak of is partly that we’ve never had to deal with nigh on half of our team all being pretty badly wounded on the one descent, and partly that the fretting resulting from this would leave us, the staff, nervous wrecks.

I have made up a totally anecdotal “two day” theory regarding peoples’ responses to injury and trauma. It’s completely without scientific evidence or backing, but does explain a pattern of behaviour that I have regularly seen over the years.

My theory holds that on the day of the trauma, the shock and adrenaline take you to the finish line. The first day afterwards sees high pain levels at the spots that you’ve traumatised, but elsewhere you have bearable amounts of pain. On the second day after the injury however, things start to really stiffen up, but the trauma itself hasn’t really healed, so you’re dealing with both stiffening and trauma, and you just feel rubbish. This is all anecdotal, mind, but is a bit of a pattern that I’ve seen emerge.

Add Roubaix cobbles on day one of the Two Day Theory, and I’m sure you can imagine how beaten up the boys felt this morning! Getting on the bike at all was a feat for some of the boys. And then things slowly improved.

Two Day Theory
I honestly don’t know. There were two of these blokes though…

The break of the day snuck away with barely a whimper from the peloton — a good sign that there were a lot of sorry lads following the enormity of the previous two days of racing. Things were tranquil throughout the day, and slowly the sprinter teams got themselves organised to bring the break back in, and set up for a bunch sprint finish.

I must admit at this point to being “Charlie non-believer” in that I was more interested in the boys not crashing than I was in them getting any results. It’s an aspect of the job that the med team always deal with. “How’d you go?” or “How was it today?” is more about “Did you have much pain? Were you the same, better or worse than yesterday?” than it is about how good were you at whatever your discipline happens to be.

And so with heart in mouth (considering the nine roundabouts in the final 5.5km) I watched the boys shoot for the line. And then they hit out well, duking it out with the best sprinters in the peloton. Jules pulled off a second and Robby fifth. This was a fantastic result that continues the Garmin-Transitions run of top-class performances when on the bike, regardless of the pain and problems that may have struck prior to this.

Absolute class from all of the boys today, long may it continue.

Toby Watsonhttps://www.veloveritas.co.uk
Ex-Garmin Transitions physiotherapist and soigneur Toby Watson brings you inside the squad, and shows you what it's like to be working with a top team on the biggest races in the world. Through his regular blog updates, Toby shares his sense of drama and fun that were essential parts of his job. Toby is Australian, and currently lives in Girona with his fiancee Amanda. If he has any time, he enjoys reading and running, and occasionally skiing too, when he can.

Related Articles

UK Tour de France Proposal Gathers Pace

Representatives from British Cycling, UK Sport and EventScotland visited the Belgian city of Liège this weekend for the Grand Depart of the 2012 Tour de France. With a proposal for the opening stages of the 2017 event being developed, the British partnership experienced the spectacular the Tour first-hand.

Le Tour de France 2012 – Stage 18: Blagnac – Brive-la-Gaillarde, 215 km.

It’s a new hotel chain today, Premiere Classe – we had a bit of a battle to get in. To keep the costs down, they only man these places in the morning and early evening – during the day you have to punch codes in to gain access. We started with credit card information, then the reservation number – no dice. Eventually we stuck Martin’s name in – et voila!

Le Tour de France, Stage 7: Tournus – Station des Rousses; Bravo Chavanel!

Chavanel! A great day for him and QuickStep - their second stage, the maillot jaune regained and the polka dot jersey retained in gallant fashion.

Le Tour de France 2016 – Stage 2; Saint-Lô – Cherbourg-en-Cotentin. Heartbreak for Stuyven as Sagan Takes Control

Peter Sagan is a breath of fresh air, the accent, the sense of humour, the hair, the bike handling, the speed, the versatility – third behind Cav and Kittel then beating Alaphilippe and Valverde. There’s no one more deserving of the maillot jaune – with all mention of the ‘curse of the rainbow jersey’ forgotten.

Alex Stieda – North America’s First TdF Maillot Jaune!

Canada’s Alex Stieda became the first North American to pull on the most famous and coveted jersey in professional cycling. Le Tour 1986, Stage One and Stieda heads off up the road solo, the peloton lets him go – a Canadian ? Paah! But there’s method in his madness as he scoops up intermediate points and time bonuses along the way; and when the winning breakaway train of five catch him he has enough strength and presence of mind to purchase a ticket. The break just holds of the screaming pack; Stieda grabs fifth behind Belgium’s Pol Verschuere – but those time bonuses have propelled the Canadian pursuiter into cycling history – he’s maillot jaune.

Le Tour de France, Stage 4: Cambrai – Reims; Ale Again

Le Tour de France Stage 4 from Cambrai and Dean was good, very good, team mate Hunter finished fastest, swooshing clear of them all - but after the line. Garmin sprinter patron Tyler Farrar sat up to peer over the sea of heaving numbers to see how his boys had done.

At Random

Team Novo Nordisk Unveils New Kit and Roster

On Thursday, Team Novo Nordisk revealed its full team roster and updated navy blue kit for the 2018 season. The world’s first all-diabetes pro cycling team will race its sixth season with 16 athletes from ten countries. The two new riders joining the team are Sam Brand (UK-Isle of Man), who raced as a stagiaire with the men’s professional team since August, and Emanuel Mini (ARG), who is moving up from the team’s development squad.

Le Tour de France 2009 – Stage 20: Montélimar > Mont Ventoux, 167km

Today was the famous Mont Ventoux stage... It's 9:00 pm and we're headed for the A7 "Autoroute du Soleil," and the drive north to Paris.

Rab Wardell – Rab’s Rás

Giro or not, we had to do our final catch up with a man who doesn't just talk about racing - he's in the saddle, jousting with old war horses like Kirsipuu and Eeckhout; Rab Wardell. As we approached the Monte Petrano climb, yesterday I caught up with Rab, back in the Old Country, via the wonders of digital technology.

Il Giro d’Italia 2014 – Stage 21; Gemona – Trieste, 169 km. Luka Mezgec Takes the Finale

Mezgec’s sprint was timed to perfection in what was a real free-for-all of a finish. And isn’t that Giant jersey livery just so effective? – there was no doubt about which kind of bike had just won as Big Luka crossed the line. Nacer Bouhanni (F des J & France) didn’t seem his usual desperate self, he said later he was too concerned about crossing the line upright and preserving his red points jersey.

Dan Fleeman – Not Making Any Mistakes

Cervelo's Dan Fleeman first came to our attention when he won the 2008 Tour of the Pyrenees; we've kept in touch with the 26 year-old Englishman ever since; through Langkawi, Paris-Nice and into the Ardennes classics.

Le Tour de France 2007 – Day 4: Stage 15, Foix – Loudenvielle Le Louron

The sun is hot even at 07.15, the autoroute is quiet, straight and fast; we're headed for le Tour and Loudenvielle Le Louron; Millie Jackson is telling us that her man is a "fine man" - what more could you want from life? It's 10.00 am now and we're on the descent off the first climb of the day, the second cat, Col de Port or Portet, depending on which sign you look at. Martin got his first look at le Tour village this morning, as always, the scrambled eggs were great and the coffee strong.