Tuesday, August 3, 2021
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Mark Cavendish at the Tour de France 2012 – He’s THAT good!

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Mark Cavendish at the Tour de France 2012; one sprint stage, one stage win. The world champ was sensational in the finale of last night’s stage. He squeezed by “The Gorilla” Andre Greipel who ran off the back of a beautifully organised leadout train.

Mark Cavendish
That takes Mark to 21 stages of the Tour!

Over the years, the dominance of Mark Cavendish has been off the back of the best leadout train in the Tour, however back in 2010 he showed he could win solo after Renshaw was ejected from the race for headbutting and not holding his line (classy).

Tonight he showed that he can win when someone else is running a great leadout train.

One of Mark Cavendish‘s great advantages is how aerodynamic he is while sprinting (elbows in, chin virtually on his bars) so he needs to push a lot fewer watts to get to warp speed when compared to his rivals.

It will be interesting to see how he goes head to head against Greipel in later stages where perhaps he’s not pushing into a headwind

Smart money has to be that he will again find away to win.

He is a freak.

Toby Watsonhttps://www.veloveritas.co.uk
Ex-Garmin Transitions physiotherapist and soigneur Toby Watson brings you inside the squad, and shows you what it's like to be working with a top team on the biggest races in the world. Through his regular blog updates, Toby shares his sense of drama and fun that were essential parts of his job. Toby is Australian, and currently lives in Girona with his fiancee Amanda. If he has any time, he enjoys reading and running, and occasionally skiing too, when he can.

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