Monday, January 24, 2022
HomeDiariesKasper Keeps Cool in Kuurne Brussels Kuurne 2020

Kasper Keeps Cool in Kuurne Brussels Kuurne 2020

Kasper Asgreen dropped breakaway survivor Boris Vallée (Bingoal-Wallonie Bruxelles), held off the peloton by seconds and put a smile on Patrick Lefevre’s face!

-

I love the drive from Gent up to Kuurne for the Kuurne Brussels Kuurne semi-classic… staring out of the car window at the fields, the canals, tree-lined avenues, the steeples, tiny concrete roads that would be great to explore on the bike.

Kuurne Brussels Kuurne
Photo©Ed Hood

There was a little rain on the way up but by the time we got to Kuurne it was a mild, sunny morning; ideal for wandering down the main drag where the busses line up and checking out 2020’s new hardware.

Deceuninck apart, access to the busses and those shiny bicycles is no bother – albeit the patch does get busier with each passing year.

At the “windows and floors” boys’ encampment it’s different; the crowd of worshipers is thick round the bus as they strain for a glimpse of their lupine idols in blue and white.

Every team is well presented, especially the big budget outfits like Trek – another difficult bus to get close to with everyone desperate to see Het Nieuwsblad winner, Big Jasper.

Kuurne Brussels Kuurne
Photo©Ed Hood
Kuurne Brussels Kuurne
Photo©Ed Hood

We especially liked the Cofidis De Rosas and the Wiliers of Total Direct Energie.

Kuurne Brussels Kuurne
Photo©Ed Hood

We liked too Belgian Champion Merlier’s (Alpecin–Fenix) white Canyon with understated red, yellow and black bands on the chainstay. 

Discs: not all the teams at Kuurne Brussels Kuurne are on them; Ineos, AG2R, Vlaanderen and UAE all stick to the old faithful rim brake.

Kuurne Brussels Kuurne
Photo©Ed Hood

Ineos even give their riders choice of the 28mm tyre-friendly K10 or the ‘even more aero’ F12 – either one would do me – but both with rim brakes.

For the Classics some of the Shimano teams are replacing the Dura Ace front discs with the heavier duty Ultegra and even XTR mountain bike discs, saying that the Dura Ace disc isn’t robust enough.

However, the XTR discs can’t cope with the heat build-up on long mountain descents so aren’t a panacea.

There’s also the issue of rotor size standardisation and axle clamping – some mechanics saying it’s fine to use power tools to secure the thru axle and others saying it’s not, running the risk of stripping the threads on the axle receiver.

In short, there’s still development to be done on disc brakes.